A trillion trees...



The World Economic Forum is launching a scheme using public and private funds to plant a trillion trees in the next ten years. Climate change now looks to be firmly set on the corporate agenda.


As the great and the good from the business World meet with politicians and global leaders at the Swiss resort of Davos, sustainability and climate change take centre stage.


This also marks the a meeting of President Trump and Greta Thunberg as both are set to deliver key note speeches at the opening of the four day event on Tuesday. It's the first time the two will be at the same event since Greta was caught on film staring down President Trump at the UN last year. The two certainly represent two sides of the issue, but whether the divide can be bridged remains to be seen.


Last Wednesday, the WEF publishes its annual risks survey, which put climate and other environmental threats ahead of risks posed by geopolitical tensions and cyberattacks.

For the first time ever, five of the top long term risks to the World, were all environmental, from Government action on Climate change and how businesses adapt to corporate responsibility over the issue, to extreme weather cyc'es, such as the bush fires in Australia.


Teenage climate activist Greta Thunberg has a strong and clear message: put an end to the fossil fuel "madness." Last year at Davos, Greta told global leaders that "our house is on fire,


81-year-old World Economic Forum founder Klaus Schwab, says the world is facing "a state of emergency."


As the World wrestles with the weight of global warming and climate change, sustainability is the main theme at this year's Davos meeting.


Many are concerned the affects of global warming will increase because of growing divides between Governments and businesses on how to tackle it.


The Davos meeting is attended by over 50 heads of state and government. They aim to iron out the importance and definition of "stakeholder capitalism" — the idea that businesses should serve the interests of all society rather than only their investors and shareholders.


Other issues on the agenda include global trade, inequality, record debt levels and geopolitical tensions in the Middle East.